Thursday, April 5, 2012

Running in an Abaya

Note to self: when morning temperatures exceed 6,000 degrees (exaggerating a little), it's best not to wear long, longish or - well, any length - cotton pants to run.

Aspire Park trail map

Because it doesn't matter whether you’re fat, thin, old, young, in shape or flabby.  It doesn't matter whether you run long-legged strong or slog injured, like me.  When you run in temperatures this hot…You. Will. Sweat.

When a person sweats into cotton, the material gets wet….in some of the most awkward places.  What's more…it stays wet.  Pretty much until removed.

No pictures.  Use your imagination.

As I bemoan my situation, a fully covered, head-to-toe black abaya-sheyla-niqab AND gloves-clad lady strolls by.  I'd seen her as I whisked (using the term loosely) around the park: her elbows out, head and shoulders back.  A solid pace, even as she wears thick sandals.  I'd found her eyes, greeted her - she replied through the veil.  Now sunglasses hide her eyes too.

HOW?  I wonder.  WHY?  The abaya is light weight, sheer, even.  Hold one layer to the light, you can see your hand.  Wind butterflies in and out as she moves, teases the material, perhaps cools her skin?


Perhaps.

But still.  The fabric is hot-attracting black.  And there's so much of it!  Does she wear runner's spandex beneath?  Wicking tee?  Nike shorts?

For sure she's not wearing cotton.

Thanks to my experiences at the Fanar's exclusive third floor ladies area

where sheylas are loosened and abayas (sometimes) drape across chairs - I know that, given the right opportunity, I might ask her.

But not today, as moisture wicks from my body and into the ill-advised and previously mentioned cotton garment.  As my pants droop like a two year old's beach diaper and darkness ebbs down my legs.

Nope, today I hold my head high, pretend the wetness doesn't matter…and head for my car.

Maybe I need an abaya.

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